Category Archives: Events Around Vancouver

Join Richmond Food Security Society for the “Clean Bin Project” documentary

Seedy Saturday in Richmond!

Raw milk should not be a crime!

I’m going – anyone want to join me? I may be a bit noisy….

Food Scraps Recycling: Making it the Norm for Businesses and Institutions

Sustainability Community Breakfast

Our next Sustainability Community Breakfast will take place Thursday, February 3, 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. at British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) downtown Vancouver campus at 555 Seymour Street, Vancouver.

Studies show that nearly half of our garbage is made up of food scraps and other compostable materials. Join us to hear how businesses and organizations across the region are reducing food waste and embracing food scraps recycling, keeping hundreds of thousands of tonnes of compostable materials out of landfills.

Speakers:
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Curtis Stone – Spin Farming is in and profitable!

For those that don’t know who Curtis Stone is, he spin farms in Kelowna (Green City Acres), and has learned how to take 1/2 an acre and turn it into gold. He gets calls from all over the planet from doctors and lawyers on how to make money farming. This is why I want to introduce you to Curtis. If we can show a viable and profitable industry and hungry market for fresh local food (I believe it’s here: demand is higher than supply) then we can change the landscape for monoculture and mass factory farming. I’m not saying get rid of it: I am thinking it needs a bit of revision. We should not be paying farmers peanuts from our tax dollars (middle men take money from us and the farmer). They should profit without subsidies, as all farmers should. And live a good life.

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Community Dan Jason on Seed Saving: How to Organize for a Resilient Future

Dan Jason from Salt Spring Seeds came to Richmond for a talk on Friday January 21. This was the overview of his comments – we all must start to save seeds NOW. This is how:

Communities are talking a lot about local food security these days because of the increasingly uncertain times in which we live. Many people have even started using the term “food sovereignty” instead of “food security” because it conveys the idea of becoming self-reliant in food rather than simply having stockpiles of dubious food shipped from far away.

A fast growing movement that’s spreading across the globe involves people organizing together in “transition towns” to address the challenges of climate change, peak oil and economic instability. You can get more background at transitionnetwork.org or you could google transition Salt Spring, Victoria, Guelph or Peterborough, for examples. The aim of these transition towns is to create the ability to manage one’s own affairs in the midst of the huge transitions we are facing. Not surprisingly, every transition community lists locally grown food as a first priority.

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